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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
opposed, 9. abstained, 41. >> the floor is to the secretary general of the united nations. >> mr. president, excellencies, ladies and gentleman, an important vote has taken place today in the general assembly. the decision [indiscernible] i stand ready to fulfill my role and report to this assembly, as requested in the resolution. my question has been consistent. the palestinians have a right to their own independent state. israel has the right to live in peace and security with its neighbors. there is no substitute for negotiations. today's vote underscores the urgency of meaningful negotiations. we must give a do impetus to ensure an independent democratic state of palestine lives with a secure state of israel. i urge the parties to renew their commitment for negotiating peace. i count on all to act responsibly, preserve your treatment in state building under the leadership of president abbas and the prime minister. thank you. [applause] >> i think the secretary-general of the united nations for a statement. >> we will break away from the united nations where they have approved
made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 243. the nays are 170. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. by the direction of the democratic caucus, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 822, resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees of the house of representatives -- one, committee on agriculture, mr. garamendi. two, committee on science, space and technology, mr. curson. mr. larson: i ask that the resoluti
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
, the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highways, $538 billion in aviation, $266 billion in transit and yet the amtrak which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that funding at $41 billion. when you consider that an compared to the oil and gas industry which has received roughly $41 billion in federal subsidies with more than half of those subsidies available to the energy sector, we have -- to bring that together we spend more and when you're with the oil and gas and energy companies and their industries than we have spent an entire in the entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the position of high-speed rail, one of those alternatives and now it may only achieves speeds achieve speeds of 83 miles per hour. surely that is significantly better than the long delays of sprawling major interstate systems that we have. this committee should continue the the to the role is a very sad to facilitate critical of the structure and the continuation of one of america's greate
through 2012 from the united states has invested $1.4 trillion in our nation's highway. 538 billion in aviation. 266 billion in transit. yet, amtrak, which was created in 1971, has received a small fraction of that spending of $41 billion. when you consider that compared to the oil and gas industry, we have spent, to bring that together, we have spent more than one year in the energy industry than we have spent an entire life of the program of amtrak. clearly, there seems to be an imbalance and it's not one that should be continued. regarding the vision of high-speed rail, but amtrak services, one of those alternatives. it may only achieve the average of 83 miles per hour, along the nec, and surely that is definitely better than the long delays of major interstate systems that we have. this committee should consider the role to facilitate the development of critical infrastructure and the continuation of one of america's greatest assets, and that is passenger rail. i would like to thank all the witnesses before the committee today. i look forward to hearing your testimony about how
who are saying that in light of the vote at the united nations where the palestinians managed to get that upgraded status, that all of those assurances are null and void, michael. >> all of this pressure that's being put on. israel has been good at ignoring outside pressure on anything. i'm curious about the palestinian side. that u.n. status upgrade does, of course, given the palestinians potential access to a whole raft of u.n. bodies, including the international criminal court. what are the palestinians saying about their options going forward? >> well, the palestinians are saying that all opings are on the table. of course aring the palestinian authority condemned the fact that these housing places were now back on the table, and, of course, they are saying that one of the avenues that they might pursue is the international criminal court, as you said, as a nonmember observer state in the u.n. general assembly. they have access to the international criminal court, and one of the big issues has always been the israeli settlement building in the west bank, which, of course, is seen
. you will see the united nations get -- get a united states shot on the arms control treaties that the united nations launch and they will supercede the constitution of the united states. that's where they're headed. >> oh, my god! >> this from the guy who sent weapons to the iranians, funding right wing death squads. and lied about it all. >> very glenn beckish right? going to be a world government. united nations is going to be -- you know, dictating american law and things like that. look, all of the crazy talk they did for the first four years and then we had election -- the american people said yeah, we like that guy. none of this is -- i think they're going to spin the tales for four more years because they sound, for that echochamber it sounds fun. >> stephanie: ben stein on o'reilly. >> a lot of angry, bitter people out there. they've got to attack something. so they attack christmas. they're not -- i don't consider them well in the head. >> what! >> nobody is being forced to bow down and worship anybody.
that the instrument that we are funding that we founded the united nations is giving the palestinian government what was you know able to win on the battlefield. the bigger issue is not just palestinian politicians and terrorists field emboldened but the iranian regime feels emboldened and that really is the player here. it's iran that supports hezbollah to the north but also hamas supplying it with funds, with training, with weapons. we're not doing anything either in washington or new york to really push back on that. >> gregg: clinton has not been getting a lot of criticism. i wonder about that. she has talked so much how many miles she has logged in countries she has visited. is that state craft? >> it's exact opposite. its photo op foreign policy rather than deal with political factors on the ground which is really what state craft is all about. it's been very important people going to very important meetings around the world and this is not just true on israel-palestinian, it's on iran, it's climate change and all these other crisis. it's a lot of photo op stuff and no real changing of factors
to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> today, republican senators continued to try to open up the massachusetts senate seat that scott brown could run for. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and would be easily confirmed by his colleagues. >> if the president wants an easy confirmation hearing and process, nominate john kerry, who is imminently qualified to be secretary of state and i believe he would sail through in the nominating process. >> joining me now, ari mel ber. ari, you're coming to us tonight from kerry country, boston and i've got to think this is a horrible moment for senator kerry. you don't want to be the guy who gets praise from the mindless attackers of susan rice. >> yeah, i don't think he wants any part of this very weird b m boomerang play the republicans are trying to practice. he knows her well because as chairman of foreign relations committee, he oversees the state department, looking at the diplomacy and ambassadors and working with secretary clinton and ambassador rice. >> well, t
-and-trade? reporter: sure, that is right. while liberal groups and others are looking for what the united nations is doing, what we used to call a kyoto at all, that process when he couldn't get a process through, he knows darn well he's not going to get through now. pushing out carbon heavy fuels like coal out of the u.s. energy mix. you mentioned west virginia. folks like democrats from those states are not happy about that. megyn: the nrdc says its approach will cost $4 billion a year. but they claim it will save over $25 billion each year in reduced pollution related illnesses like asthma. so we will wait and see if there's any action. thank you so much. dramatic new amateur video on the streets of serious capital. rebel forces battling government troops in damascus today. you can see rebel snipers shooting from inside buildings. secretary of state hillary clinton now raising more concerns that bashar al-assad may resort to using chemical weapons against his own people. hillary clinton saying the u.s. is worried about an increasingly desperate bashar al-assad may use the weapons or lose contr
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
a former chief justice of the connecticut supreme court, a former united states attorney, several partners at major connecticut and national law firms, an academic, business leaders and community leaders throughout the state. their insights and hard work throughout the process were really invaluable to my colleague from connecticut and i, and i express on this floor my gratitude to them for their service. based on the work of the advisory panel and our review of its recommendations, senator blumenthal and i recommended michael shea to the president for nomination. i will say that michael was ranked very high among the applicants, highly qualified applicants for this position by all members of the advisory panel, and i should say here right at the outset that we are grateful to president obama for nominating him for this place on our court. michael shea is a native of west hartford, connecticut, a graduate of amherst college and yale law school, served as a clerk to judge james buckley, though a resident of connecticut, sat on the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia. michael
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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